Functions of Code-Switching: Tools for Learning and Communicating in English Classes

Main Article Content

Jorge Enrique Muñoz
Yadira Fernanda Mora

Abstract

The use of code-switching in the classroom is an issue of great importance for all educators in our country since it is a resource that teachers and students may use in order to achieve a specific communicative purpose. This article scrutinizes the teacher’s and the students’ speech from an interactional point of view, as well as the findings, conclusions and implications of the finished research project. Specifically, we explored which teacher’s and second graders’ discourse functions took place when using code-switching in English classes. In addition, this document invites educators to consider the use of the L1 as a means of learning and communicating rather than an obstacle in the teaching learning process.

Article Details

How to Cite
Muñoz, J. E., & Mora, Y. F. (2006). Functions of Code-Switching: Tools for Learning and Communicating in English Classes. HOW Journal, 13(1), 31-45. Retrieved from https://howjournalcolombia.org/index.php/how/article/view/106
Section
Research Reports
Author Biographies

Jorge Enrique Muñoz, Universidad Minuto de Dios, Bogotá

Jorge Enrique Muñoz is a candidate for an M.A. in Applied Linguistics from Universidad Distrital and currently works as a full-time professor at Universidad Minuto de Dios. His research interests include cognition, writing development and materials design.

Yadira Fernanda Mora, Universidad Minuto de Dios, Bogotá

Yadira Fernanda Mora is a candidate for an M.A. in Applied Linguistics from Universidad Distrital and she currently works as a full-time professor at Universidad Minuto de Dios. Her research interests include critical thinking, reading and cooperative learning.

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