Using a Systemic Functional Genre-Based Approach to Promote a Situated View of Academic Writing Among EFL Pre-service Teachers

Main Article Content

Doris Correa
Sandra Echeverri

Abstract

This article reports partial results of a qualitative study which explored the gains and challenges encountered by two groups of English as a foreign language pre-service teachers from a public university in Medellin, Colombia, in developing a situated view of academic writing through a systemic functional genre-based instructional unit. The unit was part of a written communications course and used an approach called the teaching-learning cycle. Results from the study suggest that one of the main gains was related to pre-service teachers’ emerging understanding of context, purpose, and audience. One of the main challenges concerned pre-service teachers’ difficulty with shifting their former views of grammar as a fixed system of rules.

Article Details

How to Cite
Correa, D., & Echeverri, S. (2017). Using a Systemic Functional Genre-Based Approach to Promote a Situated View of Academic Writing Among EFL Pre-service Teachers. HOW Journal, 24(1), 44-62. https://doi.org/10.19183/how.24.1.303
Section
Research Reports
Author Biographies

Doris Correa, Universidad de Antioquia

Doris Correa holds a Doctorate degree in Language, Literacy, and Culture from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Currently, she works as an Associate Professor at the School of Languages, Universidad de Antioquia, where she has done research in English language policy, critical literacies, systemic functional linguistics, and linguistic landscapes.

Sandra Echeverri, Universidad de Antioquia

Sandra Echeverri holds a Masters’ degree in Foreign Language Teaching and Learning from Universidad de Antioquia. Currently, she works as a lecturer at the School of Languages, Universidad de Antioquia, where she has done research in assessment in foreign languages and academic literacies as part of the GIAE research group.

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